New indigenous program finds culture key to overcoming addictions

http://www.cbc.ca/m/touch/canada/saskatoon/story/1.3127380

Native Wellness Assessment instrument first of its kind in the world.

CBC News

The National Native Addictions Partnership Foundation believes traditional First Nations and Inuit culture is an integral part of a holistic approach to wellness.

 

The National Native Addictions Partnership Foundation believes traditional First Nations and Inuit culture is an integral part of a holistic approach to wellness. CBC News

There’s a strong relationship between cultural identity and addictions intervention in indigenous people, according to new research.

A first of its kind Native Wellness Assessment tool is being unveiled today in Saskatoon, which promotes recovery through indigenous culture and community.

The National Native Addictions Partnership Foundation is launching the tool, and presenting the findings of its federal government-funded research, conducted over the last three years.

The presentation comes shortly after the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s final report made nearly 100 recommendations, including a call to close the gap in health outcomes between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal communities. The report focused on issues including mental health, suicide, and addictions.

The wellness assessment tool is based on a referral function, which allows community referral workers to assess people with addictions and decide if time at a residential treatment centre will meet their needs. The assessment process is done in a culturally relevant manner, and includes questions about intergenerational trauma.

The foundation hopes to develop a holistic approach to healing and wellness that would be available to all indigenous people in Canada.

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Aboriginal inmates less likely to get early release from prison

‘Releasing someone at the end of their sentence does not make a safe community,’ John Howard spokeswoman says

By Kate Kyle, CBC News, June 25, 2015

Aboriginal prisoners are overrepresented in Canada’s federal prisons and waiting longer for parole, according to new numbers from the Public Safety Ministry, which is responsible for corrections.

Federal offenders are first eligible for parole after serving one-third of their sentences, but their release isn’t guaranteed.

However, according to the 2014 Corrections and Conditional Release Statistical Overview, nearly 85 per cent of aboriginal offenders are detained in federal prisons until they have served two-thirds of their sentences, at which time most offenders are entitled to statutory release, compared to 69 per cent of non-aboriginal offenders.

Struggles to secure housing, an inmate’s criminal record and high caseloads for legal aid lawyers all contribute to longer wait times for release of aboriginal inmates in federal prisons, says Lydia Bardak of the John Howard Society in Yellowknife.

“Statistically, aboriginal offenders are more likely to go right to the end of their sentence date, which is something we don’t want to see,” said Bardak.

“Releasing someone at the end of their sentence does not make a safe community.”

Read More at

https://warriorpublications.wordpress.com/2015/06/25/aboriginal-inmates-less-likely-to-get-early-release-from-prison/

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